Style and Hollywood

Style and Hollywood

Only fashion fades, style remains the same – Coco Chanel

Steve McQueen and his Ferrari Lusso

Recently I was looking at one of those celebrity car sites, and was struck by the fact that none of the people listed were famous.  Everyone on the site was a “wanna be” rapper, a Z-list reality star, or a drugged out bad girl.  Every picture had them either standing next to a “murdered out” Bentley, that was obviously leased, or some poor Lamborghini with 24” rims.  It looked tawdry.

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Why we need to see a crotch shot of Lindsey Lohan in some cheap Mercedes, or Kim Kardashian stumbling out of a Range Rover is beyond me.  The whole site was a waste of time, and while looking at it, one thought hit me like a pimp cup to the skull:  Style is dead in Hollywood…Boyee!

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Hollywood has always been a place of dreams, but now those dreams seem like a bad acid trip.  It’s the home of fake breasts, bad facelifts, and now matte black cars.  There is a whole cottage industry that supplies faux stars with tacky hyped up faux cars and garish rims. What passes for style is the latest Ed Hardy shirt, Jersey Shore fashions, and Lady Gaga inspired costumes.  The cars are even worse, with Lime Green Lamborghini’s, Blinged out Hummers, and ruined Phantoms dressed in Alcantara.

 

charleton Heston in 66 Jag e type

Once upon a time, in the Golden Age of Hollywood, stars were icons that were the epitome of style and fashion.  Men like Cary Grant, wearing a Jack Taylor suit and driving a custom Cord could stop traffic, and women like Marlene Dietrich and Greta Garbo could silence a room simply by entering.  Cars were an important part of this image, and the words style and Hollywood were once synonymous.

Everything in Hollywood was created by the studio, including image, fashion, and hairstyles.  Celebrities drove cars that matched the status of their stardom.  Clark Gable had several Duesenbergs, Mae West had a custom 1932 Cadillac Series 40 V16 Town car, Marlene Dietrich had a custom Cadillac, and Al Jolson had an amazing Mercedes 500K.  Sometimes the car was so integral to the image, they became almost as famous, like Jack Benny and his Maxwell, and Jayne Mansfield and her pink Lincoln.  The list of celebrities with magnificent cars extends right up to the 1960’s, including Dean Martin and Frank Sinatra with their Facel Vega’s, Carroll O’Connor and his Maserati 3500, and my two favorites:  Steve McQueen and his Ferrari Lusso, and James Coburn with his Ferrari California Spyder.

Hollywood today has nothing to offer except a quick shot of David Beckham in some hip-hop Mercedes, or Tom Hanks in a Chevy Tahoe.  It is not the same, and even a shot of Heidi Klum in her white Bentley Continental GTC only reminds us about the style that is missing.

Alan Flusser, author and men’s clothing designer said it best: “People dress by looking at other people.  There is no style anymore, and no one to look to for guidance.”  In my opinion, stars, like those of the Golden Age will never return to Hollywood, unless true style returns first.

Article courtesy of Chris Raymond

Photos courtesy of DUB Publishing and Google Images

The Best Car in the World

The Best Car in the World

Ever since I was young, I have always wanted to own a Rolls-Royce.  There was always something about the grill and mascot that made me nuts, and one day soon, I plan to make good on my promise and finally become a Rolls-Royce owner.  Here then, are two of my favorites: Silver Shadow and Corniche.  I hope you enjoy it.

The Rolls-Royce Silver Shadow was introduced in 1965, and produced in one form or another until 1980.  This is the most successful Rolls-Royce ever made, with over 38,000 cars built.  The line included three sister cars, Corniche, Silver Wraith, and Camargue, with the Corniche remaining in production until 1996.

The car replaced the aging Silver Cloud, and originally named the Silver Mist (until they discovered that “mist” is a German word for manure).  It was designed by John Polwhele Blatchley, who was the same man that designed the Silver Dawn, Silver Cloud, and the engine cowling on the British fighters, Hurricane and Spitfire.

The car featured a V8, first with 172hp, and then with 189hp, just enough to waft gently down the motorway.  The Rolls-Royce R engine once held the world speed record on land, in the air, and on water.  In fact, Rolls-Royce now builds nuclear reactors for Astute class nuclear submarines, which never require refueling.  One of the main features of the car was a self-leveling hydraulic suspension licensed from Citroen, which gave the Rolls-Royce its famous ride.

The Rolls-Royce is the only car foretold by Nostradamus (1548), “From Albion’s shore shall come a marvelous conveyance, a carriage silincieux (silent) bearing the arms of Rolles De Roi.”  It is said that 6 out of 10 Rolls-Royce cars built are still roadworthy, and that a Rolls-Royce never breaks down, it “fails to proceed.”  The Rolls-Royce is so quiet; sometimes the only way to tell if it is running is to feel heat on the bonnet.  It is also famous for its advertisement that stated, “At 60 miles an hour the loudest noise in this new Rolls-Royce comes from the electric clock,” partly because of an excessively loud clock, and partly because of the extra sound insulation.

Of course, the grill is one of the most prominent parts of the automobile, and it takes a full day to build it, by hand and eye, without the use of measuring devices.  The mascot is technically called the “Spirit of Ecstasy” and sculpted by Charles Robinson Sykes, using the mistress of the Second Lord Montague of Beaulieu as a model.  It has changed several times over the years, including a kneeling version for the USA made, Springfield MA built cars.  No two are alike.  Affectionately known as “Nellie in her Nighty,” or the “Flying Lady,” the statue is the crown jewel on the car.

Leather inside the car is from Connelly, and chosen from mature bulls raised in areas without barbed wired fences, so there are no marks on the hides.  The animals are kept in conditions as close to their natural habitat as possible, to reduce stress.  A total of 15-18 cows must sacrifice themselves just for one interior.  The interior wood is usually burled walnut or Carpathian Elm, at least 100 years old and chosen specifically for the grain.  Veneers are from a single tree, and the grain is book matched, the right and left grain structures are mirror images of each other.

Rolls-Royce is “The Best Car in the World,” due to its attention to quality, technology, and choice of materials.  There is nothing else that even comes close to it.  Not many people in the world will ever own one, but for the price of a new Mazda 3, you can find an excellent “pre-owned” example for your collection.  No other car matches the style or class of a Rolls-Royce motorcar.

Article courtesy of Chris Raymond
Photos courtesy of theroadrunner.wordpress.com, rrsilvershadow.com, bahmancars.ch, and Google images

The President on Wheels – Part II

The President on Wheels – Part II

This is the continuation of the post “Presidents on Wheels” that I thought would be perfect for July 4th.  It seems to have gotten out of hand, and I am forced to turn it into a two part series.  This final section will start with John F. Kennedy and the beginning of the “modern age” of presidential limousines, and go right up through Barack Obama.

This first limousine is the most infamous of all.  It is named the SS-100-X, and was built for John F. Kennedy.  This 1961 Lincoln Continental stretch limousine, built by Hess & Eisenhardt of Cincinnati, was the car the president was riding in when he was assassinated on November 22, 1963.  More information has been published about this car, than any other government or presidential vehicle in history, and because of the conspiracy theories, that interest is sure to continue for a long, long time.

The Continental was designed by Elwood Engel, and originally intended as the 1961 Ford Thunderbird.  This would mark the last time a single individual was completely responsible for the design of a production car.  The original concept was enlarged and slightly altered, before being switched to the Lincoln line by Robert S. McNamara.  McNamara, the new Ford president, wanted to kill off the Lincoln brand because the previous model years were unpopular.  He was convinced to re-invent the Lincoln line with this new model.  Within five weeks of becoming the first Ford president not from the Henry Ford family, he became the US Secretary of Defense, serving both Kennedy and Johnson.

The SS-100-X was a beautiful Navy blue color, and equipped with a slew of special equipment.  It had a removable plastic clear “bubbletop,” with leather covers, and a more formal covered removable roof.  The car sported a leather interior in light and dark blue, with lap blankets mounted on the doors.

It also had a rear seat that could be raised up to 10 inches and retractable steps for the Secret Service.  None of the important parts of the car were armored, and the bubbletop itself was only ¼” thick plastic.  It was a stunning car for the president, and had a certain clean appearance that defined the 1960’s.

Of course, all this changed after the assassination, and the car was remodeled for use up until 1977.  The remodel included fixing a permanent roof on the car, more armoring and eventually a more somber black paint job.  The car is now on display at the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Michigan.

On a side note, I have to say that I have always been intrigued by the assassination and associated conspiracy theories.  I was lucky to know two people that were heavily involved in the events of that day, and spent hours talking to them about the assassination.  One person was seated in a car in the motorcade.  His duties led him to act as a communications liason from Parkland Hospital that day.

The other was the Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Jack Anderson, known best for being the target of an assassination attempt by President Nixon’s White House.  He had investigated many theories about the Kennedy killing, and provided me with a lot of great knowledge.  It was a tragic day in history, and I doubt the actual truth will come out for many, many years.  If you are interested in this matter, feel free to contact me by email, so we can discuss it.

Moving on, we get to the Johnson administration, which used several cars for the president.  First, he had several Cadillac’s while the SS-100-X was being refurbished.  Then, according to one source, he had three 1965 Lincoln Continental limousines, which may have actually been the earlier cars refurbished with updated bodies.

LBJ also had a 1964 Buick Electra 225, and a 1964 Cadillac limousine, the latter was sold to Liberace.  At the ranch, LBJ had an odd group of cars, including a 1934 Ford Phaeton for hunting, which was equipped with a metal plate to prevent damage while going over rough terrain, and a bar with running water.

Others included a 1915 American LaFrance Fire Truck, and an Amphicar, an amphibious vehicle that he would drive into the lake while pretending to his terrified visitors that “the brakes had failed” and “the car would sink.”  Lastly, he had a tiny Fiat Jolly 500 Ghia, many golf carts, and a small cart towed by his two donkeys “Soup” and “Noodles.”

Richard Nixon used a 1969 Lincoln Continental Limousine, called the SS-800X, and created by Lehmann-Peterson.  The car had two tons of bulletproofing, and windows thicker than any used in fighter planes.  Originally delivered to Johnson, the new car was upgraded to include a clear, hinged hatch, used by Nixon to stand up during parades.

Nixon also ordered a 1972 Lincoln limousine, which arrived in 1974 and was used by Ford, Carter and Reagan.  The Lincoln, which was upgraded during its life, was the car that protected both Presidents Ford and Reagan from would-be assassins’ bullets.

During a 1975 assassination attempt by Sara Jane Moore in San Francisco, Secret Service agents pushed President Gerald Ford into this massive 13,000-pound Lincoln and to safety. Six years later, and now decorated to look like a 1978 Town Car model, the Secret Service used this car again as a safe haven after John Hinckley attempted to assassinate President Ronald Reagan.

Powered by a 460-cubic inch V8, this was the last presidential limousine equipped with roof openings through which the president could stand.

President Reagan also had two 1983 Cadillac Fleetwood limousines made by Hess & Eisenhardt.  The new cars featured a raised roof to provide more visibility for the president, and created a visual profile that made the car very unique.  One of these cars was actually used in the Clint Eastwood movie “In the Line of Fire” and the other is at the Ronald Reagan Presidential library.

George H.W. Bush returned to Lincoln for his limousine, requesting a custom-built stretch 1989 Town Car.  The car came equipped with a smaller raised roof and a large rear-panel glass area, as well as the engine from an F-250 truck.

President Bill Clinton switched back to Cadillac, with his new 1993 Fleetwood version.  Again, this new car came with a raised roof and larger glass area for viewing the president, as well as touches like Zebrano wood accents, black paint, and a 454 engine designed by Roush Engineering.  Several identical vehicles were delivered to the White House for service, and one is in the Clinton Presidential Library.

That car would be the last presidential car to be retired after service, and all future models would be used in security testing and probably destroyed.  One car was never in service, though, and recently sold to a private party at a Barrett Jackson auction.

In 2001, George W. Bush continued the Cadillac tradition with his new Deville Presidential limousine, which was then replaced with a 2005 DTS model.  These cars began the trend towards the massive rolling vaults that are today’s presidential limousine.  The vehicles are actually trucks, bodied to resemble a current Cadillac model, weighing 15,000 pounds, and powered by heavy-duty truck engines.  The glass alone is 5 inches thick, so thick it actually blocks out part of the light spectrum.  It is rumored that the rear compartment is self-contained, with its own air supply and special security features.

Finally, we come to “The Beast,” built for Barack Obama.  The new president’s car dwarfs even the massive Bush limo.  The weight is much heavier (possibly 10 tons), and the chassis is rumored to be that of a TopKick medium duty truck.  It is rumored to be diesel powered, and uses pieces from the latest version of the Cadillac Escalade SUV.

The entire car is covered in a minimum of 5 inches of steel along the sides, uses night vision technology, and carries defensive weaponry.  The rear portion of the car is sealed, and only the president has controls to lower the divider.  There is even a panic button in his seat, for him to summon help (sounds silly but true) and the car seats only four passengers, rather than the standard six.

The rear doors weighs about the same as the cabin door of a Boeing 757 jetliner, and the only window that can be opened is the drivers, by three inches, in case he needs to pay a toll (When does Obama need to stop and pay a toll?) or talk to other agents.  The body of the car is made up of a mixture of steel, titanium and ceramic for ballistic protection.  There is an oxygen system, a supply of the president’s blood, a few handy shotguns, and tear gas cannons.  The car also has a fire fighting system, and the standard Wi-Fi, 10-disk CD changer, and phone systems that make it a Cadillac.

Some rumored secrets are that the vehicle uses equipment based on the Mine Resistant Ambush Protected vehicles used in Iraq, and that it has a 5 inch steel V-shaped hull underneath.  One thing is for sure, the car is massive and almost threatening in appearance.  Check out the photo of the doors and you can see the multiple lock systems that secure the door like a bank vault.  President Obama said he originally asked for a hybrid, but was told that even the best available hybrid powertrain would never be able to move the car forward. As far as limousines go, this is one hell of a ride.

Article courtesy of Chris Raymond

Photos courtesy of Google Images, Getty Images, Ford Motor Company, General Motors, and Dave’s Classic Limousine Pictures

The President on Wheels – Part I

The President on Wheels – Part I

In the spirit of the 4th of July, I decided to repost this look at the most famous of all government cars, the presidential limousine.  Most people have seen a presidential motorcade on television, and recognized it as a powerful symbol of the presidency.  I have been lucky enough to see many of them up close and personal, attending inaugural events dating back to Jimmy Carter.  I have always been fascinated by the changes in the president’s limousine through the years, and enjoyed watching the fight between Cadillac and Lincoln over who will make the next car.  Since this post seems to grow every time I look at it, I will print it in two sections, following up with the “modern” era.

FDR’s 1939 Lincoln “Sunshine Special”

The presidential limousine is a tradition, as well as a security necessity that can trace it roots back to the Penn coach of 1771, used by George Washington.  This coach, led by a team of six horses, was perfect for Martha, but proved too aristocratic for the next president’s tastes.  John Adams, who was the first to establish a “State Carriage” for use by the president, required something more austere, drawn by only two horses, and lacking the painted panels and coat of arms.  In spite of this, his coach cost a hefty $1,500.00, not including another $1,000.00 for the two horses named Caesar and Cleopatra.

George Washington’s coach at Mount Vernon

When Thomas Jefferson became president, he used a phaeton carriage to set the precedent of parading down Pennsylvania Avenue after the inaugural.  James Madison had two coaches built, only to have Dolly complain about the quality, thereby forcing him to return one back to the manufacturer.  President Andrew Jackson had a coach built from the timbers of “Old Ironsides,” but never used a carriage during either inaugural.

Abraham Lincoln’s Carriage

Abraham Lincoln’s carriage, used on the night he went to Ford’s Theatre, was purchased by the Studebaker Brothers, and is now part of their museum along with the carriages of Grant, Harrison, and McKinley.  Speaking of Grant, he was the only president arrested while in office.  He was stopped and arrested by a black police officer for “speeding” his horses through the streets of Washington.  He complimented the officer, paid the $20.00 fine, and was forced to walk back to the White House on foot.  Grant, whose name is Hiram Ulysses Grant (the S was given to him by an Army clerical error) was the first man ever to run for president against a woman.

Lincoln’s Funeral Cortege (That’s Teddy Roosevelt and his brother Elliott in the 2nd floor window at age 6)

In 1899, William McKinley was the first president to ride in a motorcar, a steam carriage made by F.O. Stanley.  Though Grover Cleveland was president when Frank Duryea made the first American gas powered motor vehicle, he never rode in it, and it was not until President Warren G. Harding’s inaugural that a sitting president rode in a vehicle to an important event.  Harding also liked to go camping in a custom-made Lincoln “cook” car with his pals Harvey Firestone, Henry Ford, John Burroughs and Thomas Edison, and once lost all the White House china in a single hand of cards.

President Theodore “Teddy” Roosevelt

William Howard Taft transformed the White House stables into a garage, allotted $25,000.00 for the purchase of vehicles, and hired George H. Robinson to be the first presidential chauffeur.  Besides becoming president, Taft was the former Governor-General of the Philippines, Secretary of War, and eventual Chief Justice of the US Supreme Court.  Taft was the first president to own a car at the White House, and the first president to throw out the pitch to begin the professional baseball season.  His first purchase for the White House fleet was a White Steamer, followed by two Pierce Arrows and finally a Baker Electric Runabout, which became a favorite of Mrs. Woodrow Wilson.

President Taft in 1908 Cadillac

Wilson used the cars left over by Taft during his time as president.  After leaving office, he was given a Rolls Royce for his use, complete with the Princeton colors (Orange and Black) and a Princeton tiger radiator cap.

Woodrow Wilson’s “Princeton” Rolls Royce

Calvin Coolidge was an odd duck.  He had only five cars assigned to the White House garage, all Pierce Arrows, and never allowed any to travel faster than 16 miles per hour.  His oath of office was performed twice, the first in his father’s house, by his own father, who was a Justice of the Peace.  He refused to use a telephone while in the White House, and was famous for being a quiet man.  Once at a dinner party, a young woman said to him “I bet I can get three words out of you before the night is through.”  His response was a simple “You Lose.”

President Wilson’s Pierce Arrow

Herbert Hoover was strange in a different way from Coolidge.  He was the only president to have a non-white Vice President (Kaw Indian) and was a prominent humanitarian.  He and his wife spoke fluent Chinese, often, and he was one of two presidents to donate his salary to charity.  Hoover allowed his son to keep two pet alligators that had a tendency to wander the White House rooms, and after he left office, Hoover took a four month road trip across the west.

President Hoover’s 1932 Cadillac V16 Fleetwood Imperial

Franklin Roosevelt’s first limousine was actually owned by Al Capone, who lost it during his tax evasion trial.  His first “purpose built” limousine was dubbed the “Sunshine Special” due to the top always being in the down position.  This 1939 Lincoln was a V12, and fully armored by the Brunn Company of Buffalo NY.

FDR’s Limousine

The Secret Service required the armoring due to an assassination attempt on Roosevelt in 1933, which killed the Mayor of Chicago.  Roosevelt also used several armored Packard Limousines and two V16 Cadillac Limousines dubbed Queen Mary and Queen Elizabeth. Franklin, who was forced to wear a dress by his mother until 5 years old, was related to 11 other presidents, and the only president to serve four terms.

“Sunshine Special”

Harry S Truman disliked GM, so when it came time to replace the old Sunshine Special, he went to Ford.  Ford delivered ten specially built 1950 Lincoln Cosmopolitans to the White House, all armored, one a convertible, and all with added headroom for “high silk hats.”  The passenger compartment had gold plated metal fixtures, and the three and a half ton cars were powered by only 152 meager horses.

1950 Lincoln Cosmopolitan “Bubbletop” limousine (Queen Elizabeth II, President Eisenhower, Prince Phillip)

Dwight D. Eisenhower increased the White House garage to 37 vehicles, and converted the Lincoln convertible into a bubbletop by adding a plastic roof over the rear portion of the car. Eisenhower, who once hurt himself trying to tackle Jim Thorpe in football, was the only president to be a private pilot, the first to travel in a helicopter, and the first to submerge in a nuclear submarine.

1952 Chrysler Imperial Presidential Parade Limousine

For most, the “modern” era of presidential motoring begins with John F. Kennedy.  I will continue on with this list in my next post.

Article courtesy of Chris Raymond

Photos courtesy of searching through Google Images for hours

Sunset Boulevard

Sunset Boulevard

“I am big, it’s the pictures that got small.” – Norma Desmond, Sunset Boulevard

Recently, while spending a rainy day watching old movies, I was reminded of a great automotive icon that is rarely spoken of today.

Classic Wood

Classic Wood

What type of car do you think is a Woody Is it the Wagon Queen Family Truckster from the movies with its “metallic pea” paint and its sheets of fake wood? A beach buggy complete with surfboard? Something that can’t be discussed on a family website? For me, a New Englander, the Woodie brings to mind a great 1930’s station wagon driving up a quiet road in Vermont, the brightly colored leaves reflecting off the golden wood beams.

Woodies are known throughout the world by many different names, such Woody, Woodie, Beachwagon, Estate Car, Shooting Brake, or Brake de Chasse. They’re basically wagons with the rear section of the car made of woods like Ash and Mahogany. The beauty of each detail in these cars are amazing. Finger Joints on boards that are wrapped around the shape of a door, or the sanding and varnish work on the inside roof are as magnificent as any work by Stradivarius. The color of the wood varies with each individual make or restorer. Creating the finished product is an art, and restoring pieces of wood to match the originals is almost a miracle.

Woodies have been around since the dawn of the automobile when many bodies were created using aluminum and steel with wood bolted onto the frame. Railroads used these cars for the transport of customers and luggage because they were inexpensive, giving the cars the name “station wagon.”

Woodies were usually base cars with few options, but as the popularity grew, many luxury car brands created their own versions. In Europe, classic coachbuilders like Franay and Henri Labourdette worked in wood creating “skiff” and “torpedo cars” with boat-like lines on the chassis made by companies like Rolls-Royce, Renault, Panhard and Delahaye.

By the end of the 50’s, most Woodies were discontinued, with the remaining being created by third-party coachbuilders. New automobile regulations and improved body designs forced the end of the true Woodies, and replaced them with “faux” cars with plastic beams and sheeting. Except for a brief period during the “retro” phase recently, the days of the Woodie are over. People who really need to have the look can still buy kits for everything from a PT Cruiser to a Smart car, but I don’t think there are many cars today that would benefit from 1930’s-style wood paneling.

Article Courtesy of Chris Raymond

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The Supercar Defined

The Supercar Defined

Supercars are that, in whatever way, are exaggerated and surpass by far the requirements necessary for a car to be useful in its respective category.

The Saga of my XJS

The Saga of my XJS

Like all relationships, my love affair with my 1994 Jaguar XJS started out beautiful, but is now turning into something like the “War of the Roses.”  Once I decided that it was time to end our affair, she has turned into a vindictive little witch, out to steal every penny I have, and to turn my life into a living hell.

I bought the car in December 2006, and it was a tough decision.  I knew it wasn’t practical, and that it would be expensive to maintain, but I also knew that I had to have it.  I had loved cars my entire life, and this was the closest I would allow myself to get to owning a exotic car.  I named her Sarah, and she immediately broke my heart.  Sure it was amazing to have a car that was different than anything else on the road, but the maintenance costs were unbelievable.  The first time there was a problem, I started a search for a specialty repair shop.  The guy I came up with was an expert, and even his garage had a expert sounding name.  On the down side, he was expensive and old, so as time went on he became less and less excited to see my car.

Every time she “failed to proceed” became an event.  The logistics for getting the car to and from his shop was formidable.  The time it took to get parts, which always seemed to be locked away in the Tower of London was unfathomable, and the bill was never less than $2500.00 a visit.  After a huge amount of visits, I one day realized that Sarah could not be my daily driver.  I placed her in the garage, and only took her out for shows or weekends.

This seemed to bother Sarah, who now took to dropping parts off while parked in the garage.  Gone were the days when she would break down during a trip, now she just shed unwanted parts for attention.  This continued on for about a year, until I decided that it was finally time for us to part.  Selling her would be my big break into buying and selling classic cars.  She would be my guinea pig.  Unfortunately, she must have heard my plan, because she retaliated.

I tried to fix what I could myself, and ignored the rest.  By the time this summer came by, she was sans air conditioning, emergency brake, drivers door mirror, had started to shed her clear coat in several places like mange, and was driving about the same as a 1930’s pickup truck.  She was pissed, and she let me know it.  One night she decided that I was no longer deserving of electricity, and then another decided that low beams were now an option I would not be allowed to enjoy.  Her right rear tire exhaled all the air every time I filled it, and she refused to allow the power steering fluid cap to be opened.

I brought her to my mechanic for one last round of repairs.  Now in his 70’s, he refused to crawl around inside her, and told me he wouldn’t work on her…after a week.  I did more searching on the internet, and found a recommended repair shop in some local British car forums.  He took the car, and kept it for almost three weeks, until I finally pinned him down on what was causing the delay.  He was searching for a part, which I eventually found for him (in one hour).  Now with the part in hand, he sat on the car another two weeks before even starting any work.  Sarah it seems had colluded with him to cause me misery.

I am still without her.  She remain down at the garage having all the problems sorted, so that she can be returned in pristine condition.  When I do get her, I will list her on eBay, as if she was just a one night stand that I have tired of.  I hope that someone buys her, and get a few years of enjoyment and happiness.  She will be in the best condition of her life when she leaves.  One thing I do know is that she is British, and as such, the happy times will be short lived.  Eventually she will turn on her owner, and become the vicious bitch she really is.  From now on, I am looking at German cars.

 

 

Ten Forgotten Supercars

Ten Forgotten Supercars

What makes a supercar? For most, it is a limited production car that has unequalled handling and performance, as well as a massive pricetag. But, that is not enough to rank as a supercar; it also needs a certain panache that is lacking in regular sports car models, a certain something that separates it from the regular cars of the world. Depending on who you ask, the modern supercar can trace its roots back to 1954 Mercedes Benz 300 SL Gullwing. Famous supercars include the Lamborghini Miura, and Ferrari 365 GTS/4 Daytona. Among the infamous and forgotten supercars, are these 10 cars:

10- Argyll GT

At the same time DeLorean Motor Cars was dying, 100 miles away Bob Henderson set out to create a Scottish 200mph supercar. His supercar would be produced from 1976 to 1990, and have the name of Argyll, a company which produced cars from 1899 to 1932. Only a small handful were ever produced.

9- Bitter Tasco

Bitter is best known for his rebodied Opels, such as the SC, but occasionally he also came up with the odd off-the-wall project such as the Tasco. Built in conjunction with MGA Developments, the Tasco was presented at the 1991 Frankfurt motor show. Designed to take a V8 or V12 – although the Viper’s V10 was favorite – the Tasco never even progressed beyond the full-sized mock-up stage.

8- Dome Zero

When the wraps were taken off the Dome Zero at the 1978 Geneva motor show, there were some sharp intakes of breath. How could a Japanese outfit produce something so far out? Crazier than a Countach, the Zero was amazing, but its maker couldn’t afford to put it through Japanese homologation tests. It would not have been that quick anyway; the 2.8-litre straight six offered just 145bhp – but what a looker.

7- Gigliato Aerosa

Although Gigliato was a Japanese concern, its plan was to base itself in the UK and to become a serious rival to the established Italian design houses. That was back in 1994, when its rather attractive Aerosa was unveiled, powered by a Ford-sourced 3-litre V6. With a bit of tickling, a reliable 300bhp could be coaxed from this powerplant – but it was all academic, as by 1995 the project was history.

6- Isdera Commendatore 112i

Four years after development started, in 1993 the first Isdera Commendatore 112i was supposedly ready for delivery to its owner. Then in 1999, the car resurfaced again – only to disappear just as quickly. Priced at £500,000, the 112i packed a 414bhp 6-litre Mercedes V12 to give 210mph and 0-60mph in 4.3 seconds, plus height-adjustable suspension and wipers from Germany’s 220mph inter-city trains.

5- Jiotto Caspita

When Jiotto unveiled the Caspita in 1989, it claimed this was a car which would see a return to people driving to a race track, competing, then driving home again, all in the same car. At first there was a detuned Formula One V12 powerplant, but in 1990 a Judd V10 unit was fitted instead, either unit supposedly capable of giving over 200mph. But no customer cars were ever delivered.

4- Kodiak F1

In 1987, Mladen Mitrovic unveiled a supercar that would supposedly be the equal of anything to come out of, well, anywhere. With its 320bhp 5.4-litre Chevrolet V8, the F1 was inspired by Mercedes’ gull-winged C-111; it was claimed to be capable of sitting at 170mph all day, with absolute reliability. Later cars would get a 5.6-litre Mercedes V8 – except there weren’t any later cars.

3- Monteverdi Hai

When it comes to exclusive supercars, few are rarer than the Monteverdi Hai. Just two were built, the cars designed by Peter Monteverdi himself – despite no formal training. Power came from a 7-litre Chrysler Hemi V8, tuned to give 450bhp and 180mph. With air-conditioning, leather trim, and power everything, this was one luxurious supercar – but build quality wasn’t up to scratch and the car disappeared.

2- Nissan R390

The R390 came about because Nissan was desperate to win the Le Mans 24 Hours. When the project started, just one Japanese car had ever won the race (a Mazda); to qualify, Nissan would have to build a single road car. The cars never won Le Mans, but two road-going R390s were produced, each powered by a twin-turbo 3.5-litre V8 that churned out a useful 641bhp to give 220mph.

1- Panther Six

In the late 1970s, there was a poster of this mad hypercar on every kid’s wall. With its six-wheel layout and twin-turbo 8.2-litre Cadillac V8 hung out the back, it was one crazy monster of a car. Just two were built, each one supposedly capable of 200mph, although nobody ever got to verify this of course. If you fancy a Six, the second one built is currently for sale. It is not cheap.

Can you think of any other forgotten supercars?  Let me know, and I’ll post the results!

Reprinted from www.goshycab.com